Passover Chicken Schnitzel

Passover Chicken Schnitzel - Recipe for pounded fried chicken breasts, kosher for Passover.

Here is a version of classic Chicken Schnitzel that can be prepared during Passover with matzo meal. It’s very similar to my classic chicken schnitzel recipe, but the ingredients are all kosher for Passover. Matzo meal coating, in my experience, can be a bit more fragile than a coating made from breadcrumbs. I find the easiest way to flip the coated breasts in the skillet is to use a pair of tongs, rather than a spatula—this seems to be the best way to keep the coating intact. Dredging the breasts in matzo cake meal (finely ground matzo meal) before the egg dip also helps. The paprika in the mix is optional. Use whatever Kosher for Passover oil you prefer– I try to use oils with a high smoke point for frying, like grapeseed.

Frying adds calories, but unfortunately you can’t get that same schnitzel flavor and crispness from baking. That is why I like to serve this with a healthy side salad, like the Israeli salad shown here (click here for recipe), to lighten things up. I also serve it with fresh lemon wedges… the schnitzel is so good with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice on top. It’s one of 0ur favorite non-Seder meals during the week of Passover!

Passover Chicken Schnitzel - Recipe for pounded fried chicken breasts, kosher for Passover.

Passover Chicken Schnitzel

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts (4 large breasts)
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 cup matzo cake meal
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup matzo meal
  • 1 tbsp paprika (optional)
  • Oil for frying (make sure your oil is kosher for Passover)
  • Fresh lemon wedges or halves for garnish

You will also need

  • Plastic wrap, mallet, skillet, paper towels
Prep Time: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 15 Minutes
Total Time: 25 Minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Kosher Key: Kosher for Passover
  • Lay down a 2-foot long strip of plastic wrap on your kitchen countertop. Place chicken breasts on the plastic, leaving a 2-inch space between each breast. Cover the breasts with another strip of plastic, so the meat is sandwiched between two layers of plastic.
  • Use a mallet to pound the breasts until they are a little less than ¼ inch thick.
  • Season breasts with salt and pepper. Set up three wide, shallow bowls and a large plate on your countertop. In your first bowl, place the matzo cake meal. In your second bowl, beat the eggs. In your third bowl, stir together the matzo meal, paprika, and 1 tsp salt till well blended. Leave an empty plate nearby where you will place your coated schnitzels.
  • Pour oil into a skillet until it’s deep enough for frying (about 1 inch). Heat the oil slowly over medium. While oil is heating, dip each breast one by one into your breading bowls, coating them on both sides with each ingredient. First coat with matzo cake meal...
  • then with egg...
  • then with the matzo meal mixture.
  • The ideal temperature to fry schnitzel is around 375 degrees F. When the oil is hot (but not smoking or splattering), fry the coated breasts in single-layer batches until they are golden brown on both sides. If your oil is at the right temperature, it should take about 3-4 minutes per side. Don’t fry more than two breasts at a time in a regular sized skillet, or the oil temperature will drop and the schnitzels will become greasy.
  • After frying, set the schnitzels on a wire rack or a paper towel to drain off excess oil. Sprinkle the schnitzels with additional salt to taste. Serve hot garnished with lemon wedges and your favorite condiment.
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Category: Entrees, In the Kitchen, Meat, Nut Free, Passover - Ashkenazi, Passover - Sephardic, Recipes, Tomato Free

Comments (12)Post a Comment

  1. Mandy J says:

    I love this recipe!! Simple yet delicious. I think this may be dinner tonight!

  2. haskell adler says:

    can be made gf sub potato starch for matzo meal

  3. Carol Esther says:

    I have a question, Tori. What is matzo cake meal? I was able to buy the matzo meal, but couldn’t find the cake meal. Any suggestions? I used regular flour as a substitute….. thank you! It did turn out great though, I loved it.

    • Tori Avey says:

      Hey Carol, matzo cake meal is simply matzo meal ground very fine. It’s usually only available around the Passover holidays, but you can make it yourself by processing matzo in a food processor or blender until it’s the consistency of powder. Flour works just fine now (February), but during Passover matzo cake meal or potato starch are used because of the ban on leavened bread. Hope that helps. Glad you liked it! :)

  4. Aviva says:

    Hi Tori,
    Can this be baked in the oven instead of fried? Or any other suggestions for Chicken Scallopini?
    Thanks!

  5. Gisele Jacobson says:

    As I would like to make this for a large party (24), could I make and freeze these and reheat them in the oven?

    • Tori Avey says:

      Hi Gisele- I don’t recommend serving schnitzel reheated, I find it is a dish best served freshly fried. Reheating softens the coating and makes it less crispy.

  6. Marlene says:

    Can they be made ahead of time or baked

    • Tori Avey says:

      Hi Marlene– I don’t recommend making these ahead or baking them. Making them ahead will cause the coating to become soggy. Baking them will not produce a crisp and golden result.

  7. Rachel says:

    I am curious if I can do everything but fry them ahead of time? Or will it get too mushy?

    • Tori Avey says:

      Hi Rachel, I don’t recommend breading them more than a couple hours in advance, and keep them refrigerated… with the egg in the coating and the raw meat it can be a breeding ground for bacteria.

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